blue-10q_20170630.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2017

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                     to                    

Commission File Number: 001-35966

 

bluebird bio, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

Delaware

 

13-3680878

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(IRS Employer

Identification No.)

 

60 Binney Street

Cambridge, Massachusetts

 

02142

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip Code)

(339) 499-9300

(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.     Yes      No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).     Yes      No  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer”, “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

  

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

☐  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  

Smaller reporting company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  ☐

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).     Yes  ☐    No  

As of July 28, 2017, there were 45,589,385 shares of the registrant’s Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share, outstanding.  

 

 

 

 

 


 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties, as well as assumptions that, if they never materialize or prove incorrect, could cause our results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. We make such forward-looking statements pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other federal securities laws. All statements other than statements of historical facts contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by words such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “contemplate,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “potential,” “predict,” “project,” “seek,” “should,” “target,” “would,” or the negative of these words or other comparable terminology. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements about:

 

the initiation, timing, progress and results of our preclinical and clinical studies, and our research and development programs;

 

our ability to advance product candidates into, and successfully complete, clinical studies;

 

our ability to advance our viral vector and drug product manufacturing capabilities;

 

the timing or likelihood of regulatory filings and approvals for our product candidates;

 

the timing or success of commercialization of our product candidates, if approved;

 

the pricing and reimbursement of our product candidates, if approved;

 

the implementation of our business model, strategic plans for our business, product candidates and technology;

 

the scope of protection we are able to establish and maintain for intellectual property rights covering our product candidates and technology;

 

estimates of our expenses, future revenues, capital requirements and our needs for additional financing;

 

the potential benefits of strategic collaboration agreements and our ability to enter into strategic arrangements;

 

our ability to maintain and establish collaborations and licenses;

 

developments relating to our competitors and our industry; and

 

other risks and uncertainties, including those listed under Part II, Item 1A. Risk Factors.

Any forward-looking statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q reflect our current views with respect to future events or to our future financial performance and involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. Factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations include, among other things, those listed under Part II, Item 1A. Risk Factors and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Given these uncertainties, you should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Except as required by law, we assume no obligation to update or revise these forward-looking statements for any reason, even if new information becomes available in the future.

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q also contains estimates, projections and other information concerning our industry, our business, and the markets for certain diseases, including data regarding the estimated size of those markets, and the incidence and prevalence of certain medical conditions. Information that is based on estimates, forecasts, projections, market research or similar methodologies is inherently subject to uncertainties and actual events or circumstances may differ materially from events and circumstances reflected in this information. Unless otherwise expressly stated, we obtained this industry, business, market and other data from reports, research surveys, studies and similar data prepared by market research firms and other third parties, industry, medical and general publications, government data and similar sources.

 

 

 

 


 

bluebird bio, Inc.

Form 10-Q

For the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2017

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

 

Page

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

2

Item 1.

 

Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

2

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016

 

2

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss for the Three and Six Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016

 

3

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Six Months Ended June 30, 2017 and 2016

 

4

 

 

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

5

Item 2.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

19

Item 3.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risks

 

28

Item 4.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

28

 

 

 

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

28

Item 1.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

28

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

28

Item 5.

 

Other Information

 

58

Item 6.

 

Exhibits

 

58

 

 

 

 

 

SIGNATURES

 

59

 

 

 

 

 

CERTIFICATIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

bluebird bio, Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

(unaudited)

(in thousands, except par value amounts)

 

 

As of

 

 

As of

 

 

June 30,

 

 

December 31,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

$

686,334

 

 

$

278,887

 

Marketable securities

 

409,100

 

 

 

425,491

 

Tenant improvements receivable

 

4,334

 

 

 

8,542

 

Prepaid expenses

 

15,036

 

 

 

8,209

 

Restricted cash and other current assets

 

3,814

 

 

 

3,085

 

Total current assets

 

1,118,618

 

 

 

724,214

 

Marketable securities

 

101,625

 

 

 

180,452

 

Property and equipment, net

 

180,419

 

 

 

156,955

 

Intangible assets, net

 

18,812

 

 

 

20,694

 

Goodwill

 

13,128

 

 

 

13,128

 

Restricted cash and other non-current assets

 

24,528

 

 

 

22,679

 

Total assets

$

1,457,130

 

 

$

1,118,122

 

Liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

$

14,424

 

 

$

13,664

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

43,748

 

 

 

54,660

 

Deferred revenue, current portion

 

19,666

 

 

 

6,209

 

Total current liabilities

 

77,838

 

 

 

74,533

 

Deferred rent, net of current portion

 

2,937

 

 

 

10,408

 

Deferred revenue, net of current portion

 

19,065

 

 

 

40,204

 

Contingent consideration, net of current portion

 

3,219

 

 

 

3,277

 

Financing lease obligation, net of current portion

 

153,962

 

 

 

120,140

 

Other non-current liabilities

 

90

 

 

 

120

 

Total liabilities

 

257,111

 

 

 

248,682

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.01 par value, 5,000 shares authorized; 0 shares issued and outstanding

   at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $0.01 par value, 125,000 shares authorized; 45,539 and 40,691 shares

   issued and outstanding at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively

 

455

 

 

 

407

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

1,918,754

 

 

 

1,447,856

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

(1,415

)

 

 

(1,149

)

Accumulated deficit

 

(717,775

)

 

 

(577,674

)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

1,200,019

 

 

 

869,440

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

$

1,457,130

 

 

$

1,118,122

 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

2


 

bluebird bio, Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss

(unaudited)

(in thousands, except per share data)

 

 

For the

 

 

For the

 

 

Three Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Revenues:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

License revenue

$

10,570

 

 

$

 

 

$

10,570

 

 

$

 

Collaboration revenue

 

6,146

 

 

 

1,552

 

 

 

12,978

 

 

 

3,051

 

Total revenues

 

16,716

 

 

 

1,552

 

 

 

23,548

 

 

 

3,051

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

64,311

 

 

 

41,760

 

 

 

119,339

 

 

 

83,671

 

General and administrative

 

21,197

 

 

 

18,363

 

 

 

41,481

 

 

 

34,318

 

Change in fair value of contingent consideration

 

(970

)

 

 

1,404

 

 

 

463

 

 

 

2,417

 

Total operating expenses

 

84,538

 

 

 

61,527

 

 

 

161,283

 

 

 

120,406

 

Loss from operations

 

(67,822

)

 

 

(59,975

)

 

 

(137,735

)

 

 

(117,355

)

Interest (expense) income, net

 

(2,242

)

 

 

981

 

 

 

(687

)

 

 

1,932

 

Other (expense) income, net

 

(834

)

 

 

(76

)

 

 

(1,189

)

 

 

(66

)

Loss before income taxes

 

(70,898

)

 

 

(59,070

)

 

 

(139,611

)

 

 

(115,489

)

Income tax benefit

 

 

 

 

226

 

 

 

 

 

 

371

 

Net loss

$

(70,898

)

 

$

(58,844

)

 

$

(139,611

)

 

$

(115,118

)

Net loss per share - basic and diluted:

$

(1.73

)

 

$

(1.59

)

 

$

(3.41

)

 

$

(3.12

)

Weighted-average number of common shares used

   in computing net loss per share - basic and diluted:

 

41,035

 

 

 

36,954

 

 

 

40,936

 

 

 

36,937

 

Other comprehensive (loss) income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized (loss) gain on available-for-sale securities, net of tax of $0.0 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and $0.2 and $0.9 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, respectively

 

(165

)

 

 

330

 

 

 

(266

)

 

 

1,649

 

Comprehensive loss

$

(71,063

)

 

$

(58,514

)

 

$

(139,877

)

 

$

(113,469

)

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

3


 

bluebird bio, Inc.

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(unaudited)

(in thousands)

 

 

For the

 

 

Six Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

$

(139,611

)

 

$

(115,118

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Change in fair value of contingent consideration

 

463

 

 

 

1,001

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

6,281

 

 

 

4,747

 

Stock-based compensation expense

 

24,971

 

 

 

20,926

 

Other non-cash items

 

2,334

 

 

 

1,563

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses and other assets

 

(9,594

)

 

 

(1,722

)

Accounts payable

 

2,003

 

 

 

(3,132

)

Accrued expenses and other liabilities

 

(8,509

)

 

 

2,497

 

Deferred revenue

 

(7,682

)

 

 

7,669

 

Deferred rent

 

507

 

 

 

469

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

(128,837

)

 

 

(81,100

)

Investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchase of property and equipment

 

(39,509

)

 

 

(6,057

)

Purchases of marketable securities

 

(116,740

)

 

 

(80,845

)

Proceeds from maturities of marketable securities

 

210,810

 

 

 

226,825

 

Restricted cash

 

 

 

 

209

 

Net cash provided by investing activities

 

54,561

 

 

 

140,132

 

Financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proceeds from public offering of common stock, net of issuance costs

 

436,805

 

 

 

 

Cash paid for contingent purchase price consideration

 

 

 

 

(2,025

)

Reimbursement of tenant improvements for financing lease obligation

 

36,399

 

 

 

 

Payments on financing lease obligation

 

(120

)

 

 

 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock

 

8,639

 

 

 

1,353

 

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

481,723

 

 

 

(672

)

Increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

407,447

 

 

 

58,360

 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

 

278,887

 

 

 

164,269

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

$

686,334

 

 

$

222,629

 

Non-cash investing and financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets acquired under financing lease obligation

$

2,297

 

 

$

24,725

 

Purchases of property and equipment included in accounts payable and accrued expenses

$

1,194

 

 

$

909

 

Offering expenses included in accounts payable and accrued expenses

$

191

 

 

$

 

Tenant improvements under financing lease included in tenant improvements receivable

$

3,635

 

 

$

 

 

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

4


 

bluebird bio, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

1. Description of the business

bluebird bio, Inc. (the “Company” or “bluebird”) was incorporated in Delaware on April 16, 1992, and is headquartered in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Company researches, develops, manufactures and plans to commercialize gene therapies for the treatment of severe genetic diseases and cancer. Since its inception, the Company has devoted substantially all of its resources to its research and development efforts relating to its product candidates, including activities to manufacture product candidates, conduct clinical studies of its product candidates, perform preclinical research to identify new product candidates and provide general and administrative support for these operations.

 

2. Summary of significant accounting policies and basis of presentation

Basis of presentation and principles of consolidation

The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements are unaudited and have been prepared by the Company in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“GAAP”) as found in the Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) and Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”). Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in the Company’s annual financial statements have been condensed or omitted. These interim condensed consolidated financial statements, in the opinion of management, reflect all normal recurring adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of the Company’s financial position and results of operations for the interim periods ended June 30, 2017 and 2016.

The results of operations for the interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results of operations to be expected for the full year. These interim financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2016, and the notes thereto, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) on February 22, 2017.

The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries: Precision Genome Engineering, Inc. (“Pregenen”), bluebird bio France – SARL, bluebird bio Australia Pty Ltd., bluebird bio (UK) Ltd., bluebird bio (Bermuda) Ltd., bluebird bio Securities Corporation, and bluebird bio (Switzerland) GmbH. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. Any reference in these notes to applicable guidance is meant to refer to GAAP. The Company views its operations and manages its business in one operating segment. All material long-lived assets of the Company reside in the United States.

Certain aggregations of prior year amounts have been made to conform to current year presentation. In the prior year balance sheet, tenant improvements receivable, prepaid expenses and restricted cash and other current assets are included within prepaid expenses and other current assets. In the prior period statements of operations and comprehensive loss, interest and other (expense) income were aggregated.  In the current period statements of operations and comprehensive loss, interest (expense) income and other (expense) income are disclosed separately.

Summary of accounting policies

The significant accounting policies and estimates used in the preparation of the condensed consolidated financial statements are described in the Company’s audited financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2016, and the notes thereto, which are included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K. There have been no material changes in the Company’s significant accounting policies during the six months ended June 30, 2017.

Net loss per share

Basic net loss per share is calculated by dividing net loss attributable to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted net income per share is calculated by dividing the net income attributable to common stockholders by the weighted-average number of common stock equivalent shares outstanding for the period, including any dilutive effect from outstanding stock options, unvested restricted stock, restricted stock units, and employee stock purchase plan using the treasury stock method.

5


 

Property and equipment

Property and equipment is stated at cost. Maintenance and repairs that do not improve or extend the lives of the respective assets are expensed to operations as incurred. Upon disposal, the related cost and accumulated depreciation is removed from the accounts and any resulting gain or loss is included in the results of operations. Depreciation and amortization is calculated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, which are as follows:

 

Asset

 

Estimated useful life

Building

 

40 years

Computer equipment and software

 

3 years

Office and laboratory equipment

 

2 -5 years

Leasehold improvements

 

Shorter of the useful life or remaining lease term

Leases

In September 2015, the Company entered into a lease agreement for additional office and laboratory space located at 60 Binney Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, which was built between 2015 and March 2017, at which time 60 Binney Street became the Company’s corporate headquarters. This lease expires in 2027, subject to the Company’s right to extend the lease for an additional 10 years. Because the Company was involved in the construction project, it was deemed for accounting purposes to be the owner of the building during the construction period. Accordingly, the Company recorded project construction costs incurred by the landlord as an asset in “Property and equipment, net” and a related financing obligation in “Accrued expenses and other current liabilities” and “Financing lease obligation, net of current portion” on its condensed consolidated balance sheets.

Upon completion of the construction of the building in the first quarter of 2017, the Company evaluated the lease and determined that it did not meet the criteria for “sale-leaseback” treatment. Accordingly, the Company is depreciating the building and incurring interest expense in its condensed consolidated statement of operations related to the financing obligation recorded on its condensed consolidated balance sheet. The Company bifurcates its lease payments pursuant to the lease into (i) a portion that is allocated to the financing obligation related to the building and (ii) a portion that is allocated to the land on which the building was constructed. The portion of the lease obligation allocated to the land is treated for accounting purposes as an operating lease that commenced in September 2015 and is recorded on a straight-line basis over the initial lease term. See Note 7, “Commitments and contingencies,” for additional information.

Stock-based compensation

The Company accounts for its stock-based compensation awards in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718, Compensation—Stock Compensation (“ASC 718”). ASC 718 requires all stock-based payments to employees, including grants of employee stock options and restricted stock units and modifications to existing stock options, to be recognized in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income (loss) based on their fair values. The Company uses the Black-Scholes option pricing model to determine the fair value of options granted.

The Company’s stock-based awards are subject to either service or performance-based vesting conditions. Compensation expense related to awards to employees and directors with service-based vesting conditions is recognized on a straight-line basis based on the grant date fair value over the associated service period of the award, which is generally the vesting term. Compensation expense related to awards to non-employees with service-based vesting conditions is recognized based on the then-current fair value at each financial reporting date prior to the measurement date over the associated service period of the award, which is generally the vesting term, using the accelerated attribution method. Compensation expense related to awards to employees with performance-based vesting conditions is recognized based on the grant date fair value over the requisite service period using the accelerated attribution method to the extent achievement of the performance condition is probable. Compensation expense related to awards to non-employees with performance-based vesting conditions is recognized based on the then-current fair value at each financial reporting date prior to the measurement date over the requisite service period using the accelerated attribution method to the extent achievement of the performance condition is probable.

The Company expenses restricted stock unit awards to employees based on the fair value of the award on a straight-line basis over the associated service period of the award. Awards of restricted stock units to non-employees are adjusted through stock-based compensation expense at each reporting period end to reflect the current fair value of such awards and expensed using an accelerated attribution model.

The Company estimates the fair value of its option awards to employees and directors using the Black-Scholes option pricing model, which requires the input of and subjective assumptions, including (i) the expected stock price volatility, (ii) the calculation of

6


 

expected term of the award, (iii) the risk-free interest rate, and (iv) expected dividends. Due to the lack of company specific historical and implied volatility data of its common stock, the Company uses a weighted-average of expected volatility based on the estimated expected volatilities of a representative group of publicly traded companies; this representative group includes the Company’s data effective January 2017. The other public companies on which the Company has based its expected stock price volatility are companies with comparable characteristics to it, including enterprise value, risk profiles, position within the industry, and with historical share price information sufficient to meet the expected term of the stock-based awards. The Company computes historical volatility data using the daily closing prices for the selected companies’ shares during the equivalent period of the calculated expected term of the stock-based awards.  The Company has estimated the expected term of its employee stock options using the “simplified” method, whereby, the expected term equals the arithmetic average of the vesting term and the original contractual term of the option due to its lack of sufficient historical data. The risk-free interest rates for periods within the expected term of the option are based on the U.S. Treasury securities with a maturity date commensurate with the expected term of the associated award. The Company has never paid, and does not expect to pay, dividends in the foreseeable future.

As a result of the adoption of ASU 2016-09, Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting, effective January 1, 2017, the Company accounts for forfeitures as they occur instead of estimating forfeitures at the time of grant and revising those estimates in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from its estimates. Stock-based compensation expense recognized in the financial statements is based on awards for which performance or service conditions are expected to be satisfied.

Consistent with the guidance in FASB ASC Topic 505-50, Equity-Based Payments to Non-Employees, the fair value of each non-employee stock option is estimated at the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model with assumptions generally consistent with those used for employee stock options, with the exception of expected term, which is over the contractual life.

Use of estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could materially differ from those estimates. Management considers many factors in selecting appropriate financial accounting policies and controls, and in developing the estimates and assumptions that are used in the preparation of these financial statements. Management must apply significant judgment in this process. In addition, other factors may affect estimates, including: expected business and operational changes, sensitivity and volatility associated with the assumptions used in developing estimates, and whether historical trends are expected to be representative of future trends. The estimation process often may yield a range of potentially reasonable estimates of the ultimate future outcomes and management must select an amount that falls within that range of reasonable estimates. This process may result in actual results differing materially from those estimated amounts used in the preparation of the financial statements. Estimates are used in the following areas, among others: subsequent fair value estimates used to assess potential impairment of long-lived assets, including goodwill and intangible assets, financing lease obligation, contingent consideration, stock-based compensation expense, accrued expenses, revenue and income taxes.

Recent accounting pronouncements

Recently adopted

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-09, Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting, which simplifies share-based payment accounting through a variety of amendments. The amendments are effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within those annual periods. The Company adopted this standard effective January 1, 2017.  The adoption of this standard impacted the income tax footnote disclosure and did not have a material impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements. Upon adoption of the new standard, all excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies (including tax benefits of dividends on share-based payment awards) are recognized as income tax expense or benefit in the income statement. The tax effects of exercised or vested awards are treated as discrete items in the reporting period in which they occur. The Company also recognizes excess tax benefits regardless of whether the benefit reduces taxes payable in the current period. The Company has applied the modified retrospective adoption approach beginning in 2017 and prior periods have not been adjusted.  As a result, the Company established a net operating loss deferred tax asset of $76.7 million to account for prior period excess tax benefits through retained earnings, however an offsetting valuation allowance of $76.7 million will also be established through retained earnings because it is not more likely than not that the deferred tax asset will be realized due to historical and expected future losses, such that there is no impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated financial statements. The Company also elected to account for forfeitures as they occur, and recorded a cumulative catch up of $0.5 million within additional paid-in capital and retained earnings upon adoption in the first quarter of 2017.

7


 

Not yet adopted

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (“Topic 606”), which supersedes all existing revenue recognition requirements, including most industry-specific guidance. The new standard requires a company to recognize revenue when it transfers goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration that the company expects to receive for those goods or services. The new standard will be effective on January 1, 2018 and earlier application is permitted only for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim reporting periods within that reporting period. Topic 606 allows for either a full retrospective adoption, in which the standard is applied to all of the periods presented, or a modified retrospective application, in which the standard is applied to the most current period presented in the financial statements. The Company expects to adopt this standard using the modified retrospective approach.  The majority of revenue generated in the six months ended June 30, 2017 is from the Company’s collaboration arrangement with Celgene. The Company is continuing to assess the potential impact that Topic 606 may have on its financial position and results of operations as it relates to this arrangement.  It is expected that the evaluation of variable consideration, and in particular, milestone payments due from Celgene will require further judgement to assess whether to include them in the transaction price, which could accelerate revenue recognized under ASC 606 compared to ASC 605.  The Company has substantially completed its assessment of the ASC 606 impact on its two out-licensing revenue generating arrangements and does not expect the adoption of ASC 606 to have a material impact on its financial position and results of operations.

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases, (“ASU 2016-02”), which requires a lessee to recognize assets and liabilities on the balance sheet for operating leases and changes many key definitions, including the definition of a lease. The new standard includes a short-term lease exception for leases with a term of 12 months or less, as part of which a lessee can make an accounting policy election not to recognize lease assets and lease liabilities. Lessees will continue to differentiate between finance leases (previously referred to as capital leases) and operating leases using classification criteria that are substantially similar to the previous guidance. The new standard will be effective beginning January 1, 2019, and early adoption is permitted for public entities. The Company is currently evaluating the potential impact ASU 2016-02 may have on its financial position and results of operations.

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows: Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments (“Topic 230”). The new standard clarifies certain aspects of the statement of cash flows, including the classification of contingent consideration payments made after a business combination and several other clarifications not currently applicable to the Company. The new standard also clarifies that an entity should determine each separately identifiable source or use within the cash receipts and cash payments on the basis of the nature of the underlying cash flows. In situations in which cash receipts and payments have aspects of more than one class of cash flows and cannot be separated by source or use, the appropriate classification should depend on the activity that is likely to be the predominant source or use of cash flows for the item. The new standard will be effective for the Company on January 1, 2018. The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s condensed consolidated statements of cash flows upon adoption.

 

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-18, Statement of Cash Flows: Restricted Cash (“ASU 2016-18”). The amendments in this update require that amounts generally described as restricted cash and restricted cash equivalents be included within cash and cash equivalents when reconciling the beginning-of-period and end-of-period total amounts shown on the statement of cash flows. ASU 2016-18 will be effective January 1, 2018, with early adoption permitted. As of June 30, 2017, the Company has not elected to early adopt this guidance, but expects the adoption to have an impact on its consolidated statement of cash flows as, upon adoption, it will include the Company’s restricted cash balance in the cash and cash equivalents reconciliation of operating, investing and financing activities.

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-04, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment.  To address concerns over the cost and complexity of the two-step goodwill impairment test, the amendments in this ASU remove the second step of the test. An entity will apply a one-step quantitative test and record the amount of goodwill impairment as the excess of a reporting unit's carrying amount over its fair value, not to exceed the total amount of goodwill allocated to the reporting unit. The new guidance does not amend the optional qualitative assessment of goodwill impairment. The new standard will be effective beginning January 1, 2020 with early adoption permitted with measurement dates on or after January 1, 2017.  The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial position or results of operations upon adoption.

In April 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-08, Receivables – Nonrefundable Fees and Other Costs (“Subtopic 310-20”). The new standard amends the amortization period for certain purchased callable debt securities held at a premium by shortening the amortization period for the premium to the earliest call date. Subtopic 310-20 calls for a modified retrospective application under which a cumulative-effect adjustment will be made to retained earnings as of the beginning of the first reporting period in which the guidance is adopted. The new standard will be effective beginning January 1, 2019, and early adoption is permitted for public entities. The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial position or results of operations upon adoption.

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In May 2017, the FASB issued ASU 2017-09, Compensation – Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope Modification Accounting.  The new standard is intended to reduce the diversity in practice and cost and complexity when applying the guidance in Topic 718 to a change to the terms or conditions of a share-based payment award.  The new standard will be effective beginning January 1, 2019. The adoption of this standard is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s financial position or results of operations upon adoption.

 

 

3. Marketable securities

The following table summarizes the available-for-sale securities held at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 (in thousands):

 

Description

 

Amortized

Cost

 

 

Unrealized

Gains

 

 

Unrealized

Losses

 

 

Fair

Value

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. government agency securities and treasuries

 

$

508,141

 

 

$

 

 

$

(780

)

 

$

507,361

 

Certificates of deposit

 

 

3,360

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,364

 

Total

 

$

511,501

 

 

$

4

 

 

$

(780

)

 

$

510,725

 

December 31, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. government agency securities and treasuries

 

$

600,001

 

 

$

34

 

 

$

(575

)

 

$

599,460

 

Certificates of deposit

 

 

6,480

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

(3

)

 

 

6,483

 

Total

 

$

606,481

 

 

$

40

 

 

$

(578

)

 

$

605,943

 

 

No available-for-sale securities held as of June 30, 2017 or December 31, 2016 had remaining maturities greater than three years.

 

 

4. Fair value measurements

The following table sets forth the Company’s assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 (in thousands):

 

Description

 

Total

 

 

Quoted

prices in

active

markets

(Level 1)

 

 

Significant

other

observable

inputs

(Level 2)

 

 

Significant

unobservable

inputs

(Level 3)

 

June 30, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

686,334

 

 

$

686,334

 

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

Marketable securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. government agency securities and treasuries

 

 

507,361

 

 

 

 

 

 

507,361

 

 

 

 

Certificates of deposit

 

 

3,364

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,364

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

1,197,059

 

 

$

686,334

 

 

$

510,725

 

 

$

 

Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contingent consideration

 

$

3,219

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

3,219

 

Total liabilities

 

$

3,219

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

3,219

 

December 31, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

278,887

 

 

$

278,887

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Marketable securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U.S. government agency securities and treasuries

 

 

599,460

 

 

 

 

 

 

599,460

 

 

 

 

Certificates of deposit

 

 

6,483

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,483

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

884,830

 

 

$

278,887

 

 

$

605,943

 

 

$

 

Liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Contingent consideration

 

$

7,756

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

7,756

 

Total liabilities

 

$

7,756

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

 

$

7,756

 

 

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Cash and cash equivalents

The Company considers all highly liquid securities with original final maturities of three months or less from the date of purchase to be cash equivalents. As of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, cash and cash equivalents comprise funds in cash, money market accounts, and federally insured deposits.

Marketable securities

The amortized cost of available-for-sale securities is adjusted for amortization of premiums and accretion of discounts to maturity. At June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the balance in the Company’s accumulated other comprehensive loss was composed primarily of activity related to the Company’s available-for-sale marketable securities. There were no realized gains on the sale of available-for-sale securities during the six months ended June 30, 2017, and as a result, the Company did not reclassify any amounts out of accumulated other comprehensive loss for the same period.

The aggregate fair value of securities held by the Company in an unrealized loss position for less than twelve months as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 was $481.8 million and $376.1 million, respectively. As of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, there were $15.6 million and $95.5 million in securities held by the Company in an unrealized loss position for more than twelve months. The Company has the intent and ability to hold such securities until recovery. The Company determined that there was no material change in the credit risk of the above investments. As a result, the Company determined it did not hold any investments with any other-than-temporary impairment as of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016.

Contingent consideration

On June 30, 2014, the Company acquired Pregenen.  In connection with the acquisition, the Company recorded contingent consideration pertaining to the amounts potentially payable to Pregenen’s former equityholders pursuant to the Stock Purchase Agreement (the “Stock Purchase Agreement”) by and among the Company, Pregenen and Pregenen’s former equityholders. Contingent consideration is measured at fair value and is based on significant inputs not observable in the market, which represents a Level 3 measurement within the fair value hierarchy. The valuation of contingent consideration uses assumptions the Company believes would be made by a market participant. The Company assesses these estimates on an on-going basis as additional data impacting the assumptions is obtained. Future changes in the fair value of contingent consideration related to updated assumptions and estimates are recognized within the condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.

Contingent consideration may change significantly as development progresses and additional data are obtained, impacting the Company’s assumptions regarding probabilities of successful achievement of related milestones used to estimate the fair value of the liability and the timing in which they are expected to be achieved. In evaluating the fair value information, considerable judgment is required to interpret the market and internal data used to develop the estimates. The estimates of fair value may not be indicative of the amounts that could be realized in a current market exchange. Accordingly, the use of different market and internal assumptions and/or different valuation techniques could result in materially different fair value estimates.

The significant unobservable inputs used in the measurement of fair value of the Company’s contingent consideration are probabilities of successful achievement of clinical and commercial milestones, the period in which these milestones are expected to be achieved ranging from 2019 to 2026 and discount rates ranging from 14.2% to 15.5%. Significant increases or decreases in any of the probabilities of success would result in a significantly higher or lower fair value measurement, respectively. Significant increases or decreases in these other inputs would result in a significantly lower or higher fair value measurement, respectively.

The table below provides a roll-forward of fair value of the Company’s contingent consideration obligations, which include Level 3 inputs (in thousands):

 

 

For the Six Months Ended

 

 

June 30, 2017

 

Fair value, beginning of period

$

7,756

 

Additions

 

 

Changes in fair value

 

463

 

Reclassification to accrued expenses

 

(5,000

)

Payments

 

 

Fair value, end of balance

$

3,219

 

 

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The Company may be required to make up to $120.0 million in remaining future contingent cash payments to the former equityholders of Pregenen upon the achievement of certain milestones related to the Pregenen technology, of which $20.1 million relates to clinical milestones and $99.9 million relates to commercial milestones. The clinical and commercial milestone achievement end dates are between 2021 and 2028.  During the quarter ended June 30, 2017, a $5.0 million preclinical milestone was achieved and is included as a component of accrued expenses and other current liabilities as of June 30, 2017.  The remaining $3.2 million contingent consideration obligations are reflected as a non-current liability as of June 30, 2017.  

 

5. Property and equipment, net

Property and equipment, net, consists of the following (in thousands):

 

 

As of

 

 

As of

 

 

June 30,

2017

 

 

December 31, 2016

 

Building

$

160,403

 

 

$

-

 

Computer equipment and software

 

4,904

 

 

 

1,655

 

Office equipment

 

4,188

 

 

 

1,427

 

Laboratory equipment

 

20,946

 

 

 

16,305

 

Leasehold improvements

 

65

 

 

 

13,697

 

Construction-in-progress

 

476

 

 

 

136,315

 

Total property and equipment, gross

 

190,982

 

 

 

169,399

 

Less accumulated depreciation and amortization

 

(10,563

)

 

 

(12,444

)

Total Property and equipment, net

$

180,419

 

 

$

156,955

 

 

As of June 30, 2017, total property and equipment, gross, includes $160.4 million related to the Company’s new headquarters at 60 Binney Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts, of which $154.6 million was incurred by the landlord. The majority of the 60 Binney Street building was placed into service during the first quarter of 2017 with the remainder placed into service during the second quarter of 2017. Construction-in-progress as of December 31, 2016 included $126.9 million related to remaining construction costs at 60 Binney Street, of which $120.1 million was incurred by the landlord. Please refer to Note 7, "Commitments and contingencies," for further information.

 

 

6. Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities consist of the following (in thousands):

 

 

As of

 

 

As of

 

 

June 30,

2017

 

 

December 31, 2016

 

Accrued goods and services

$

26,170

 

 

$

34,275

 

Employee compensation

 

8,708

 

 

 

11,296

 

Accrued Pregenen preclinical milestone

 

5,000

 

 

 

 

Accrued license and milestone fees

 

724

 

 

 

2,464

 

Accrued professional fees

 

1,416

 

 

 

1,492

 

Deferred rent, current portion

 

 

 

 

11

 

Contingent consideration, current portion

 

 

 

 

4,479

 

Other

 

1,730

 

 

 

643

 

Total accrued expenses and other current liabilities

$

43,748

 

 

$

54,660

 

 

 

7. Commitments and contingencies

The Company is party to various agreements, principally relating to licensed technology, that require future payments relating to milestones not met at June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016 or royalties on future sales of specified products.

The Company enters into standard indemnification agreements in the ordinary course of business. Pursuant to these agreements, the Company indemnifies, holds harmless, and agrees to reimburse the indemnified party for losses suffered or incurred by the indemnified party, generally the Company’s business partners or customers, in connection with claims by any third party with respect to the Company’s products or business activities. The term of these indemnification agreements is generally perpetual any time after

11


 

execution of the agreement. The maximum potential amount of future payments the Company could be required to make under these indemnification agreements is unlimited. The Company has never incurred costs to defend lawsuits or settle claims related to these indemnification agreements.

Operating Lease Commitments

On June 3, 2013, the Company entered into a nine-year building lease for approximately 43,600 square feet of space located at 150 Second Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, which commenced in December 2013. This lease was amended in June 2014 to add approximately 9,900 square feet. The lease originally had monthly lease payments of $0.2 million for the first 12 months, which increased to $0.3 million per month beginning in December 2014 due to the lease amendment, with annual rent escalations thereafter. Rent expense is recognized on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease. The lease provided a contribution from the landlord towards the initial build-out of the space of up to $7.8 million. The Company capitalizes the leasehold improvements as property and equipment and records the landlord incentive payments received as deferred rent and amortizes these amounts as reductions to rent expense over the lease term. In addition, in accordance with the lease, the Company entered into a cash-collateralized irrevocable standby letter of credit naming the landlord as beneficiary, which has a balance of $0.6 million as of June 30, 2017.  The Company expects the $0.6 million letter of credit to be released in the third quarter of 2017.

On September 30, 2016, the Company entered into an Assignment and Assumption of Lease (“Assignment”) relating to its lease at 150 Second Street. Under the Assignment, the Company assigned all of its rights, interests, obligations and responsibilities under the lease effective May 1, 2017.  Accordingly, $8.3 million of tenant improvement assets were disposed and $8.0 million of non-current deferred rent was removed from the condensed consolidated balance sheets as of June 30, 2017, with the resulting loss of $0.3 million recorded within the condensed consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive loss during the second quarter of 2017.

On June 29, 2015, the Company entered into a lease agreement for additional office space located at 215 First Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts.  Under the terms of the lease, the Company leased approximately 15,120 square feet starting on July 13, 2015 for $0.5 million per year in base rent, which was subject to a 3% annual rent increase plus certain operating expenses and taxes. The lease term was until August 31, 2020, and included early termination provisions that could allow the Company to terminate the lease without penalty at the end of the 20th full calendar month following the delivery of the premises if the Company meets certain conditions specified within the lease.  Under the terms of the lease, the Company also leased an additional 8,075 square feet of office space in the same premises starting on January 1, 2016 for an additional $0.3 million per year in base rent, which was subject to a 3% annual rent increase plus certain operating expenses and taxes.  The Company terminated this lease effective April 12, 2017.

 

On June 3, 2016, the Company entered into a strategic manufacturing agreement for the future commercial production of the Company’s Lenti-D and LentiGlobin product candidates with a contract manufacturing organization. Under this 12 year agreement, the contract manufacturing organization will complete the design, construction, validation and process validation of the leased suites prior to anticipated commercial launch of the product candidates. During construction, the Company is required to pay $12.5 million upon the achievement of certain contractual milestones, and may pay up to $8.0 million in additional contractual milestones if the Company elects its option to lease additional suites. The Company paid $5.0 million for the achievement of the first and second contractual milestones during 2016 and paid the third milestone of $3.0 million during the first quarter of 2017. Following construction completion, the Company will pay $5.1 million per year in fixed suite fees as well as certain fixed labor, raw materials, testing and shipping costs for manufacturing services, and may pay additional suite fees if it elects its option to reserve or lease additional suites. The Company may terminate this agreement any time after July 1, 2016 upon payment of a one-time termination fee and up to 24 months of fixed suite and labor fees. The Company concluded that this agreement contains an embedded lease as the suites are designated for the Company’s exclusive use during the term of the agreement. The Company concluded that it is not the deemed owner during construction nor is it a capital lease under ASC 840-10, Leases - Overall.  As a result, the Company will account for the agreement as an operating lease and expense the rental payments on a straight-line basis over the non-cancellable term of the embedded lease.

 

12


 

On November 18, 2016, the Company entered into an agreement for future clinical and commercial production of the Company’s LentiGlobin gene therapy drug products with a contract manufacturing organization at an existing facility. The term of the agreement is five years with a three year renewal at the mutual option of each party. Under the agreement, the Company is required to pay an up-front fee of €3.0 million, €2.0 million of which was paid in the fourth quarter of 2016 and €1.0 million of which is expected to be paid in mid-2018, and annual maintenance and production fees of up to €9.8 million, depending on its production needs. The Company may terminate this agreement with six months’ notice and a one-time termination fee prior to July 1, 2018, or twelve months’ notice and a one-time termination fee thereafter. The Company concluded that this agreement contains an embedded lease as the clean rooms are designated for the Company’s exclusive use during the term of the agreement, and determined that it is not a capital lease under ASC 840-10, Leases – Overall . As a result, the Company will account for the agreement as an operating lease and expense the rental payments on a straight-line basis over the non-cancellable term of the embedded lease.

 

60 Binney Street Lease Commitments

On September 21, 2015, the Company entered into a lease agreement for additional office and laboratory space located in a building (the “Building”) at 60 Binney Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts (the “60 Binney Street Lease”).  Under the terms of the 60 Binney Street Lease, starting on October 1, 2016, the Company will lease approximately 253,108 square feet of office and laboratory space at $72.50 per square foot per year, or $18.4 million per year in base rent, which is subject to scheduled annual rent increases of 1.75% plus certain operating expenses and taxes.  The Company also executed a $9.2 million letter of credit upon signing the 60 Binney Street Lease, which was required to be collateralized with a bank account at a financial institution in accordance with the 60 Binney Street Lease agreement. This letter of credit was increased to $13.8 million during the third quarter of 2016 as required under the terms of the lease. Subject to the terms of the lease and certain reduction requirements specified therein, including market capitalization requirements, this amount may decrease back to $9.2 million over time. The 60 Binney Street Lease will continue until March 31, 2027.  Pursuant to a work letter entered into in connection with the 60 Binney Street Lease, the landlord will contribute an aggregate of $42.4 million toward the cost of construction and tenant improvements for the Building. The purpose of the 60 Binney Street Lease was to replace the Company’s previously leased premises at 150 Second Street and 215 First Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Company has the option to extend the 60 Binney Street Lease for two successive five-year terms. The Company occupied 60 Binney Street beginning on March 27, 2017.

Because the Company was involved in the construction project, including having responsibility to pay for a portion of the costs of finish work and mechanical, electrical, and plumbing elements of the Building, among other items, the Company was deemed for accounting purposes to be the owner of the Building during the construction period. Accordingly, costs that were incurred by the landlord directly or indirectly through reimbursement to the Company as part of its tenant improvement allowance have been recorded as an asset in “Property and equipment, net” with a related financing obligation in “Accrued expenses and other current liabilities” and “Financing lease obligation, net of current portion” on the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets. Tenant improvement costs that are reimbursable by the landlord and have not yet been paid to the Company are recorded in “Tenant improvements receivable” on the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets. Tenant improvement costs that are not reimbursable by the landlord are only recorded in “Property and equipment, net” on the Company’s condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

The Company evaluated the 60 Binney Street Lease upon occupancy on March 27, 2017 and determined that the 60 Binney Street Lease did not meet the criteria for “sale-leaseback” treatment. This determination was based on, among other things, the Company's continuing involvement with the property in the form of non-recourse financing to the lessor. Accordingly, upon occupancy, the Company commenced depreciating the portion of the building in service over a useful life of 40 years and incurred interest expense related to the financing obligation, which was $3.7 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017.

The Company bifurcates its lease payments pursuant to the 60 Binney Street Lease into (i) a portion that is allocated to the Building and (ii) a portion that is allocated to the land on which the Building has been constructed, which is recorded as rental expense. The Company began making lease payments pursuant to the 60 Binney Street Lease in March 2017. The portion of the lease obligation allocated to the land is treated for accounting purposes as an operating lease that commenced upon execution of the 60 Binney Street Lease in September 2015. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company recognized $0.5 million and $0.9 million of non-cash rental expense attributable to the land.

As of June 30, 2017, Property and equipment, net, includes $160.4 million related to the Building, of which $154.6 million has been incurred by the landlord. As of June 30, 2017, Tenant improvements receivable of $4.3 million, which consists of tenant improvement costs reimbursable by the landlord that had not yet been received, was recorded in the condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

13


 

As of December 31, 2016, Property and equipment, net, includes $126.9 million related to the Building, of which $120.1 million has been incurred by the landlord. As of December 31, 2016, Tenant improvements receivable was $8.5 million, $7.8 million of which was received by the Company in January 2017.

 

 

8. Significant agreements

Celgene Corporation

Original Collaboration Agreement

On March 19, 2013, the Company entered into a Master Collaboration Agreement (the “Collaboration Agreement”) with Celgene Corporation (“Celgene”) to discover, develop and commercialize potentially disease-altering gene therapies in oncology. The collaboration is focused on applying gene therapy technology to genetically modify a patient’s own T cells, known as chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR T cells, to target and destroy cancer cells. Additionally, on March 19, 2013, the Company entered into a Platform Technology Sublicense Agreement (the “Sublicense Agreement”) with Celgene pursuant to which the Company obtained a sublicense to certain intellectual property from Celgene, originating under Celgene’s license from Baylor College of Medicine.

Under the terms of the Collaboration Agreement, the Company received a $75.0 million up-front, non-refundable cash payment. The Company was responsible for conducting discovery, research and development activities through completion of Phase I clinical studies, if any, during the initial term of the Collaboration Agreement, or three years. The collaboration is governed by a joint steering committee (“JSC”) formed by an equal number of representatives from the Company and Celgene. The JSC, among other activities, reviews the collaboration program, reviews and evaluates product candidates and approves regulatory plans. In addition to the JSC, the Collaboration Agreement provides that the Company and Celgene each appoint representatives to a patent committee, which is responsible for managing the intellectual property developed and used during the collaboration.

Amended Collaboration Agreement

On June 3, 2015, the Company and Celgene amended and restated the Collaboration Agreement (the “Amended Collaboration Agreement”).  Under the Amended Collaboration Agreement, the parties will now focus the collaboration exclusively on anti- B-cell maturation antigen (“BCMA”) product candidates for a new three-year term. In connection with the Amended Collaboration Agreement, the Company received an upfront, one-time, non-refundable, non-creditable payment of $25.0 million to fund research and development under the collaboration. The collaboration will continue to be governed by the JSC. 

Under the terms of the Amended Collaboration Agreement, for up to two product candidates selected for development under the collaboration, the Company is responsible for conducting and funding all research and development activities performed up through completion of the initial Phase I clinical study of such product candidate.

On a product candidate-by-product candidate basis, up through a specified period following enrollment of the first patient in an initial Phase I clinical study for such product candidate (the “Option Period”), the Company has granted Celgene an option to obtain an exclusive worldwide license to develop and commercialize such product candidate pursuant to a written agreement, the form of which the Company has already agreed upon. In the event that Celgene exercises its option with respect to any product candidate, the Company may elect to co-develop and co-promote the product candidate in the United States, provided that, if the Company does not exercise its option co-develop and co-promote the first product candidate in-licensed by Celgene under the Amended Collaboration Agreement, then the Company will not be permitted to exercise its option to co-develop and co-promote any future product candidates under the Amended Collaboration Agreement. If Celgene elects to exercise its option to exclusively in-license a product candidate, it must pay the Company an option fee in the amount of $10.0 million for the first product candidate and $15.0 million for any additional product candidates.    

 

On February 10, 2016, Celgene exercised its option to obtain an exclusive worldwide license to develop and commercialize bb2121, the first product candidate under the Amended Collaboration Agreement, pursuant to an executed license agreement entered into by the parties on February 16, 2016 and paid the associated $10.0 million option fee. The Company expects to initiate an initial Phase I clinical study for bb21217, the second product candidate arising from the collaboration, in 2017. Accordingly, Celgene may exercise its option to obtain an exclusive worldwide license to develop and commercialize bb21217 by paying the associated $15.0 million option fee.  

 

The Company may now exercise its option to co-develop and co-promote bb2121 within the United States, which it currently expects to elect. The Company’s election to co-develop and co-promote must be made at the substantial completion of the ongoing Phase 1 trial of bb2121. If elected, the Company will share equally in all costs relating to developing, commercializing and manufacturing the product candidate within the United States. Under this scenario, the Company may receive, per product, up to $10.0

14


 

million in clinical milestone payments and, outside of the United States, up to $54.0 million in regulatory milestone payments, and up to $36.0 million in commercial milestone payments. In addition, to the extent bb2121 is commercialized, the Company would be entitled to receive tiered royalty payments ranging from the mid-single digits to low-teens based on a percentage of net sales generated outside of the United States, subject to certain reductions.

In the event the Company does not exercise its option to co-develop and co-promote bb2121, the Company will receive an additional fee in the amount of $10.0 million. Under this scenario, the Company may be eligible to receive up to $10.0 million in clinical milestone payments, up to $117.0 million in regulatory milestone payments, and up to $78.0 million in commercial milestone payments. In addition, to the extent bb2121 is commercialized, the Company would be entitled to receive a percentage of net sales as a royalty in a range from the mid-single digits to low-teens, subject to certain reductions.

Accounting Analysis

The Company’s Amended Collaboration Agreement with Celgene contains the following deliverables: (i) research and development services, (ii) participation on the JSC, (iii) participation on the patent committee, (iv) a license to the first product candidate, (v) manufacture of vectors and associated payload for incorporation into the first optioned product candidate under the license, and (vi) participation on the JGC under the co-development and co-promotion agreement for the first optioned product candidate under the license.

The license to the first product candidate was considered a deliverable at the inception of the arrangement and therefore the associated option fee was included in allocable arrangement consideration as the Company believed there was minimal risk with regard to whether Celgene will exercise the option based on the successful completion of preclinical activities and proximity of enrollment of the first patient in an initial Phase I clinical study for this product candidate. The Company determined that the obligation within the license to manufacture or have manufactured supplies of vectors and associated payloads for incorporation into the first optioned product candidate is a deliverable, consistent with the option to license the first product candidate.

However, the Company determined that the options to license any additional product candidates are substantive options and therefore were not considered deliverables at execution of the Amended Collaboration Agreement. Celgene is not contractually obligated to exercise the options. Additionally, as a result of the uncertain outcome of the discovery, research and development activities, the Company is at risk with regard to whether Celgene will exercise the options to license additional product candidates. Moreover, the Company determined that the options are not priced at a significant and incremental discount. Accordingly, the options to other product candidates are not considered deliverables and the associated option fees are not included in allocable arrangement consideration.

Upon execution of the Amended Collaboration Agreement in June 2015, the Company concluded that each of the three delivered elements at the inception of the agreement (research and development services, participation on the JSC and participation on the patent committee) had standalone value from the other undelivered elements. Additionally, the Amended Collaboration Agreement does not include return rights related to the collaboration term. Accordingly, each deliverable qualified as a separate unit of accounting.

The Company determined that each of the delivered elements had the same period of performance (the three year term through projected initial Phase I clinical study substantial completion) and the same pattern of revenue recognition, ratably over the period of performance as there was no other discernible pattern of recognition. The Company identified the allocable arrangement consideration as the $25.0 million up-front research and development funding payment, $10.0 million option fee for the first product candidate, $20.0 million related to remaining deferred revenue from the original Collaboration Agreement, and $54.1 million of contingent revenue related to the estimated amounts that will be received from Celgene for manufacturing services. The $109.0 million total allocable arrangement consideration was allocated based on the relative estimated selling price of the separate units of accounting at the inception of the amended agreement, resulting in $17.3 million allocated to the three delivered elements at the inception of the agreement, which will be recognized over an initial three year term.

The Company determined that each of the identified deliverables that qualify as a separate unit of accounting continue to have the same period of performance (the three year term through projected initial Phase I clinical study substantial completion) and the same pattern of revenue recognition, ratably over the period of performance as there is no other discernible pattern of recognition, and therefore there is no change in the recognition of $17.3 million allocated to these three elements. As of June 30, 2017, this will continue to be recognized over a three-year term that began in June 2015.

However, the Company concluded that the license to bb2121 does not have standalone value from one of the undelivered elements, the post-initial Phase I the manufacture of vectors and associated payload for bb2121 under the license, because the manufacturing is essential to the license agreement. The Company is required to reassess its conclusions on standalone value of deliverables upon

15


 

delivery, and therefore, upon commencement of manufacturing services in the first quarter of 2017, the Company updated its assessment. The Company determined that there were no changes and that the bb2121 license agreement continues to not have standalone value from the manufacturing services. Accordingly, these two deliverables qualify as a single combined unit of accounting.

Revenue recognition for the combined unit of accounting commenced during the first quarter of 2017 after the Company reached agreement with Celgene regarding the budget and timing for such manufacturing services. Accordingly, revenue of $6.0 million and $10.9 million was recognized during the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 related to the combined unit of accounting. The Company recognizes revenue associated with the combined unit of accounting using the proportional performance method. In using this method, the Company estimated, through discussions with Celgene regarding their development plan for bb2121, the proportion of effort it incurred as a percentage of total effort it expects to incur and applied this ratio to the total estimated budget for the post-initial Phase I manufacture of vectors and associated payload for bb2121. In developing the total estimated budget, management assumed that the Company will exercise its option to co-develop and co-promote bb2121 and therefore is currently recognizing revenue related to 67.5% of worldwide development costs incurred, which represents the percentage the Company is contractually entitled to bill Celgene under the cost share provisions of the co-develop and co-promote agreement. Costs incurred and billable by Celgene to the Company under the co-develop and co-promote agreement were $1.6 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and are recorded as an offset to collaboration revenue in the condensed consolidated statement of operations. In the event that the Company does not exercise its option to co-develop and co-promote bb2121, the Company expects to recognize the remaining 32.5% of worldwide development costs, as Celgene would be responsible for 100% of costs incurred plus a markup. Actual costs could materially differ from these estimates, and management has applied significant judgment in the process of developing its budget estimates. Any changes to these estimates will be recognized in the period in which they change as a cumulative catch up. Assuming the co-develop and co-promote agreement is executed and other revenue recognition criteria have been met, the Company expects to recognize approximately $89.5 million, before any offsetting expenses reimbursable to Celgene, between the commencement of post-Phase 1 development in the first quarter of 2017 and the end of development in 2021. The period of performance and recognition pattern will be revisited as the development plan changes or if other events impacting the deliverables occur. The Company also recognized $0.2 million and $0.6 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, of revenue related to other development costs incurred, which are billable under the collaboration agreement. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, the Company recognized no revenue related to the combined unit of account comprised of the bb2121 license agreement and manufacturing services, and no revenue related to other development costs incurred.

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company recognized revenue of $1.6 million and $3.1 million related to research and development services, respectively.  During the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, the Company recognized revenue of $1.6 million and $3.1 million related to research and development services, respectively.

The Company evaluated all of the milestones that may be received in connection with Celgene’s option to license a product candidate resulting from the collaboration. In evaluating if a milestone is substantive, the Company assesses whether: (i) the consideration is commensurate with either the Company’s performance to achieve the milestone or the enhancement of the value of the delivered item(s) as a result of a specific outcome resulting from the Company’s performance to achieve the milestone, (ii) the consideration relates solely to past performance and (iii) the consideration is reasonable relative to all of the deliverables and payment terms within the arrangement. All clinical and regulatory milestones that may be received under the option to the license agreement are considered substantive on the basis of the contingent nature of the milestone, specifically reviewing factors such as the scientific, clinical, regulatory, commercial and other risks that must be overcome to achieve the milestone as well as the level of effort and investment required. Accordingly, such amounts will be recognized as revenue in full in the period in which the associated milestone is achieved, assuming all other revenue recognition criteria are met. All commercial milestones will be accounted for in the same manner as royalties and recorded as revenue upon achievement of the milestone, assuming all other revenue recognition criteria are met.

During the three months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recognized collaboration revenue of $6.1 million and $1.6 million, respectively, related to research and development services, delivery of the license to bb2121 and manufacturing services for bb2121 vector and plasmids under its collaboration with Celgene. During the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, the Company recognized collaboration revenue of $13.0 million and $3.1 million, respectively, related to research and development services, delivery of the license to bb2121 and manufacturing services for bb2121 vector and plasmids under its collaboration with Celgene. As of June 30, 2017 and December 31, 2016, there was $38.7 million and $46.4 million, respectively, of total deferred revenue related to the Company’s collaboration with Celgene, which is classified as current or non-current in the condensed consolidated balance sheets. As of June 30, 2017, Restricted cash and other non-current assets includes a $5.3 million receivable related to cost reimbursement from Celgene for bb2121 development costs incurred to date, net of costs incurred and billable by Celgene to the Company of $1.6 million. There was no receivable from Celgene as of December 31, 2016.

 

Novartis Pharma AG

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On April 26, 2017, the Company entered into a worldwide license agreement with Novartis Pharma AG (“Novartis”). Under the terms of the agreement, Novartis non-exclusively licensed certain patent rights related to lentiviral vector technology to develop and commercialize CAR T cell therapies for oncology, including CTL019, Novartis’s anti-CD19 CAR T investigational therapy. Financial terms of the agreement include a $7.5 million payment upon execution, $7.5 million of potential future milestone payments associated with regulatory approval, and $1.1 million of payments for each subsequently licensed product, as well as low single digit royalty payments on net sales of covered products. Nonrefundable license fees are recognized as revenue upon delivery provided there are no undelivered elements in the arrangement.  At the date of contract inception, only one deliverable was identified and accordingly the entire nonrefundable license fee was recognized.  

Given that there were no further deliverables identified in the contract, all regulatory milestones will be recognized as revenue in full in the period in which the associated milestone is achieved, assuming all other revenue recognition criteria are met.

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company recognized revenue $7.5 million upon delivery of the license, as there were no other undelivered elements in the arrangement.  

 

GlaxoSmithKline Intellectual Property Development Limited

On April 28, 2017, the Company entered into a worldwide license agreement with GlaxoSmithKline Intellectual Property Development Limited (“GSK”). Under the terms of the agreement, GSK non-exclusively licensed certain patent rights related to lentiviral vector technology to develop and commercialize gene therapies for Wiscott-Aldrich syndrome and metachromatic leukodystrophy, two rare genetic diseases. Financial terms of the agreement include a nonrefundable upfront payment of $3.0 million as well as $1.3 million of potential milestone payments for each marketing authorization for each indication in any country as well as low single digit royalties on net sales of covered products.  Nonrefundable license fees are recognized as revenue upon delivery provided there are no undelivered elements in the arrangement.  At the date of contract inception, only one deliverable was identified and accordingly the entire nonrefundable license fee was recognized as revenue.  

Given that there were no further deliverables identified in the contract, all regulatory milestones will be recognized as revenue in full in the period in which the associated milestone is achieved, assuming all other revenue recognition criteria are met.

During the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, the Company recognized revenue of $3.0 million upon delivery of the license, as there were no other undelivered elements in the arrangement.

 

 

9. Equity

In June 2017, the Company sold 4,831,500 shares of common stock (inclusive of 571,500 shares of common stock sold by the Company pursuant to the full exercise of an overallotment option granted to the underwriters in connection with the offering) through an underwritten public offering at a price of $105.00 per share for aggregate net proceeds of $436.8 million.

 

 

10. Stock-based compensation

In January 2017, the number of shares of common stock available for issuance under the 2013 Stock Option and Incentive Plan (“2013 Plan”) was increased by approximately 1.6 million shares as a result of the automatic increase provision of the 2013 Plan. As of June 30, 2017, the total number of shares of common stock available for issuance under the 2013 Plan was approximately 1.7 million.

Stock-based compensation expense

Stock-based compensation expense by award type included within the condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss was as follows (in thousands):

 

 

For the

 

 

For the

 

 

Three Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Stock options

$

10,764

 

 

$

9,057

 

 

$

20,107

 

 

$

17,984

 

Restricted stock units

 

2,636

 

 

 

1,626

 

 

 

4,592

 

 

 

2,753

 

Employee stock purchase plan

 

89

 

 

 

99

 

 

 

272

 

 

 

189

 

 

$

13,489

 

 

$

10,782

 

 

$

24,971

 

 

$

20,926

 

 

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As of June 30, 2017, the Company had $128.0 million of unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to unvested stock options, restricted stock units and the employee stock purchase plan, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 2.7 years.

 

Stock-based compensation expense by classification included within the condensed consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss was as follows (in thousands): 

 

 

For the

 

 

For the

 

 

Three Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

Six Months Ended

June 30,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Research and development

$

6,797

 

 

$

5,330

 

 

$

12,451

 

 

$

10,011

 

General and administrative

 

6,692

 

 

 

5,452

 

 

 

12,520

 

 

 

10,915

 

 

$

13,489

 

 

$

10,782

 

 

$

24,971

 

 

$

20,926

 

 

Stock options

The following table summarizes the stock option activity under the Company’s equity award plans (shares in thousands):

 

 

Shares

 

 

Weighted-average

exercise price

per share

 

Outstanding at December 31, 2016

 

3,735

 

 

$

52.17

 

Granted

 

943

 

 

$

80.41

 

Exercised

 

(395

)

 

$

20.61

 

Canceled or forfeited

 

(92

)

 

$

85.22

 

Outstanding at June 30, 2017

 

4,191

 

 

$

60.77

 

Exercisable at June 30, 2017

 

2,075

 

 

$

45.74

 

Vested and expected to vest at June 30, 2017

 

4,191

 

 

$

60.77

 

 

During the six months ended June 30, 2017, 0.4 million shares of common stock were exercised, resulting in total proceeds to the Company of $8.1 million. In accordance with the Company’s equity award plans, the shares were issued from a pool of shares reserved for issuance under the equity award plans.

Restricted stock units

The following table summarizes the restricted stock unit activity under the Company’s equity award plans (shares in thousands):

 

 

Shares

 

 

Weighted-average

grant date

fair value

 

Unvested balance at December 31, 2016

 

263

 

 

$

63.07

 

Granted

 

266

 

 

$

81.83

 

Vested

 

(59

)

 

$

67.54

 

Forfeited

 

(10

)

 

$

58.50

 

Unvested balance at June 30, 2017

 

460

 

 

$

73.45

 

 

Employee stock purchase plan

On June 3, 2013, the Company’s board of directors adopted its 2013 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (“2013 ESPP”), which was subsequently approved by its stockholders and became effective upon the closing of the Company’s IPO on June 24, 2013. The 2013 ESPP authorizes the initial issuance of up to a total of 238,000 shares of the Company’s common stock to participating employees. The first offering period under the 2013 ESPP opened on August 1, 2014. During the six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016, 11,079 shares and 9,758 shares of common stock were issued under the 2013 ESPP, respectively.

 

 

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11. Income taxes

Deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities are recognized based on temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax basis of assets and liabilities using statutory rates. A valuation allowance is recorded against deferred tax assets if it is more likely than not that some or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. Due to the uncertainty surrounding the realization of the favorable tax attributes in future tax returns, the Company has recorded a full valuation allowance against the Company’s otherwise recognizable net deferred tax assets. 

 

 

12. Net loss per share

The following common stock equivalents were excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per share for the periods indicated because including them would have had an anti-dilutive effect (in thousands):

 

 

For the Three and Six Months Ended

 

 

June 30,

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Outstanding stock options

 

4,191

 

 

 

4,103

 

Restricted stock units

 

460

 

 

 

338

 

ESPP shares

 

11

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

4,662

 

 

 

4,451

 

 

 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following information should be read in conjunction with the unaudited financial information and the notes thereto included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and the audited financial information and the notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, which was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or the SEC, on February 22, 2017.

Except for the historical information contained herein, the matters discussed in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q may be deemed to be forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. We make such forward-looking statements pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other federal securities laws. In this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, words such as “may,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” and similar expressions (as well as other words or expressions referencing future events, conditions or circumstances) are intended to identify forward-looking statements.

Our actual results and the timing of certain events may differ materially from the results discussed, projected, anticipated, or indicated in any forward-looking statements. We caution you that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and that our actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate may differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report. In addition, even if our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate are consistent with the forward-looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report, they may not be predictive of results or developments in future periods.

The following information and any forward-looking statements should be considered in light of factors discussed elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including those risks identified under Part II, Item 1A. Risk Factors.

We caution readers not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements made by us, which speak only as of the date they are made. We disclaim any obligation, except as specifically required by law and the rules of the SEC, to publicly update or revise any such statements to reflect any change in our expectations or in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statements may be based, or that may affect the likelihood that actual results will differ from those set forth in the forward-looking statements.

Overview

We are a clinical-stage biotechnology company committed to developing potentially transformative gene therapies for severe genetic diseases and cancer. With our lentiviral-based gene therapy and gene editing capabilities, we have built an integrated product platform with broad potential application in these areas. We believe that gene therapy for severe genetic diseases has the potential to change the way these patients are treated by correcting the underlying genetic defect that is the cause of their disease, rather than offering treatments that only address their symptoms. Our clinical programs in severe genetic diseases include our LentiGlobin® product candidate to treat transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia, or TDT, and to treat severe sickle cell disease, or severe SCD, and our Lenti-DTM product candidate to treat cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy, or CALD, a rare hereditary neurological disorder. Our programs in oncology are built upon our leadership in lentiviral gene delivery and T cell engineering, with a focus on developing novel T cell-

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based immunotherapies, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and T cell receptor (TCR) T cell therapies. bb2121, our lead product candidate in oncology, is a CAR T cell product candidate for the treatment of multiple myeloma, which we have exclusively licensed to Celgene Corporation, or Celgene.

We are conducting four clinical studies of our LentiGlobin product candidate: a Phase I/II study in the United States, Australia, and Thailand for the treatment of subjects with TDT, called the Northstar Study (HGB-204); a multi-site, international, Phase III study for the treatment of subjects with TDT and a non-β00 genotype, called the Northstar-2 Study (HGB-207); a single-center Phase I/II study in France for the treatment of subjects who with TDT or with severe SCD (HGB-205); and a multi-site Phase I study in the United States for the treatment of subjects with severe SCD (HGB-206). We have achieved our enrollment target of 18 patients in the Northstar Study. We have achieved our enrollment target for the adult and adolescent cohort in the Northstar-2 Study. In addition, we intend to initiate in 2017 our planned Phase III study of our LentiGlobin product candidate for patients with TDT and a β00 genotype, called the Northstar-3 Study (HGB-212). Both TDT and severe SCD are rare, hereditary blood disorders that often lead to severe anemia and shortened lifespans. Our LentiGlobin product candidate has been granted Orphan Drug status by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, and the European Medicines Agency, or EMA, for the treatment of both β-thalassemia and SCD. Our LentiGlobin product candidate was granted Fast-Track designation by the FDA for the treatment of β-thalassemia major and for the treatment of certain patients with severe SCD. The FDA has granted Breakthrough Therapy designation to our LentiGlobin product candidate for the treatment of transfusion-dependent patients with β-thalassemia major. The EMA has granted access to its Priority Medicines (PRIME) scheme for our LentiGlobin product candidate for the treatment of TDT. Based on our discussions with the EMA, we believe that we may be able to seek conditional approval for our LentiGlobin product candidate, with our improved manufacturing process, for the treatment of subjects with TDT and a non-β00 genotype on the basis of the totality of the clinical data from our ongoing studies with LentiGlobin. For efficacy, we believe that the Northstar Study and supportive ongoing HGB-205 study, together with the data available from our ongoing Northstar-2 Study and our long-term follow-up study LTF-303, could support the filing of a marketing authorization application in the European Union. This plan is contingent upon all of the studies conducted in patients with TDT with the LentiGlobin product candidate demonstrating sufficient efficacy and safety, and in particular, transfusion independence (the primary endpoint) and reduction in transfusion requirements (a secondary endpoint), for efficacy analyses in the Northstar, HGB-205 and Northstar-2 studies.

We are conducting a multi-site, international, Phase II/III clinical study of our Lenti-D product candidate, called the Starbeam Study (ALD-102), for the treatment of subjects with CALD, a rare, hereditary neurological disorder that is often fatal. Our Lenti-D product candidate has been granted Orphan Drug status by the FDA and the EMA for the treatment of adrenoleukodystrophy. In October 2013, we announced that the first subject had been treated in this study and in May 2015 we announced the achievement of enrollment of 18 subjects in this study. In December 2016, we announced that we intend to expand the Starbeam Study to enroll up to eight additional subjects. We are also conducting an observational study of subjects with CALD treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplant referred to as the ALD-103 study.  

In March 2013, we entered into a global strategic collaboration with Celgene Corporation, or Celgene, to discover, develop and commercialize chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells, or CAR T cells, as potentially disease-altering therapies in oncology. This collaboration had an initial term of three years, and Celgene made a $75.0 million up-front, non-refundable cash payment to us as consideration for entering into the collaboration. In June 2015, we amended and restated the collaboration agreement, or the Amended Collaboration Agreement, to focus exclusively on anti-BCMA product candidates for a new three-year term.  B-cell maturation antigen, or BCMA, is a cell surface protein that is expressed on normal plasma cells and on most multiple myeloma cells, but is absent from other normal tissues. As consideration for the Amended Collaboration Agreement, we received an upfront, non-refundable cash payment of $25.0 million to fund research and development under the collaboration.  During the six months ended June 30, 2017 and June 30, 2016, we recognized $13.0 million and $3.1 million of revenue associated with our collaboration with Celgene. As of June 30, 2017, and December 31, 2016, we have classified $38.7 million and $46.4 million of deferred revenue related to our collaboration with Celgene as current or non-current in the accompanying balance sheets. In February 2016, we initiated a Phase I clinical study of bb2121, the first anti-BCMA product candidate from this collaboration, and we exclusively licensed to Celgene the right to develop and commercialize bb2121. Celgene announced plans to initiate a pivotal trial for bb2121 in relapsed/ refractory multiple myeloma in 2017. We may elect to co-develop and co-promote bb2121, and any other product candidates in the United States under this collaboration arrangement. In addition, we anticipate initiating in 2017 a Phase I clinical study in the United States to evaluate the safety and efficacy of bb21217, the next anti-BCMA CAR T cell product candidate arising from our collaboration with Celgene, which would result in a $15.0 million payment to us if Celgene exercises its option to exclusively license this product candidate.

In June 2014, we acquired Precision Genome Engineering, Inc., or Pregenen, a privately-held biotechnology company headquartered in Seattle, Washington. Through the acquisition, we obtained rights to Pregenen’s gene editing and cell signaling technology. The agreement provided for up to $135.0 million in future contingent cash payments by us upon the achievement of certain preclinical, clinical and commercial milestones related to the Pregenen technology. As of June 30, 2017, there are $120.0 million in future contingent cash payments, of which $20.1 million relates to clinical milestones and $99.9 million relates to commercial milestones. We estimate future contingent cash payments have a fair value of $3.2 million as of June 30, 2017, all of which is classified as a non-current liability on our condensed consolidated balance sheet.

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As of June 30, 2017, we had cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities of approximately $1.2 billion. We expect that our existing cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities will be sufficient to fund our current operations into 2020.

Since our inception in 1992, we have devoted substantially all of our resources to our development efforts relating to our product candidates, including activities to manufacture product candidates in compliance with good manufacturing practices, or GMP, to conduct clinical studies of our product candidates, to provide general and administrative support for these operations and to protect our intellectual property. We do not have any products approved for sale and have not generated any revenue from product sales. We have funded our operations primarily through the sale of common stock in our public offerings, private placements of preferred stock and warrants and through collaborations.

We have never been profitable and have incurred net losses in each year since inception. Our net loss was $70.9 million and $139.6 million for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017, respectively, and our accumulated deficit was $717.8 million as of June 30, 2017. Substantially all of our net losses resulted from costs incurred in connection with our research and development programs and from general and administrative costs associated with our operations. We expect to continue to incur significant expenses and increasing operating losses for at least the next several years. We expect our expenses will increase substantially in connection with our ongoing and planned activities, as we:

 

conduct clinical studies for our LentiGlobin, Lenti-D, bb2121, and bb21217 product candidates;

 

increase research and development-related activities for the discovery and development of oncology product candidates;

 

continue our research and development efforts;

 

manufacture clinical study materials and develop large-scale manufacturing capabilities;

 

seek regulatory approval for our product candidates; and

 

add personnel to support our product development and commercialization efforts.

We do not expect to generate revenue from product sales unless and until we successfully complete development and obtain regulatory approval for one or more of our product candidates, which we expect will take a number of years and is subject to significant uncertainty. We have no commercial-scale manufacturing facilities, and all of our manufacturing activities are contracted out to third parties. Additionally, we currently utilize third-party contract research organizations, or CROs, to carry out our clinical development activities; and we do not yet have a sales and marketing organization. If we seek to obtain regulatory approval for any of our product candidates, we expect to incur significant commercialization expenses as we prepare for product sales, marketing, manufacturing, and distribution. Accordingly, we will seek to fund our operations through public or private equity or debt financings, strategic collaborations, or other sources. However, we may be unable to raise additional funds or enter into such other arrangements when needed on favorable terms or at all. Our failure to raise capital or enter into such other arrangements as and when needed would have a negative impact on our financial condition and our ability to develop our products.

Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with product development, we are unable to predict the timing or amount of increased expenses or when or if we will be able to achieve or maintain profitability. Even if we are able to generate revenues from the sale of our products, we may not become profitable. If we fail to become profitable or are unable to sustain profitability on a continuing basis, then we may be unable to continue our operations at planned levels and be forced to reduce our operations.

 

 

Financial operations overview

Revenues

To date, we have not generated any revenues from the sale of products. Our revenues have been derived from collaboration arrangements, research fees, license fees and grant revenues.

Collaboration revenue is generated exclusively from our collaboration arrangement with Celgene, which was amended in 2015. The terms of this amended arrangement contain multiple deliverables, which include: (i) research and development services, (ii) participation on the joint steering committee, (iii) participation on the patent committee, (iv) a license to the first product candidate, (v) manufacture of vectors and associated payload for incorporation into the first optioned product candidate under the license, and (vi) participation on the joint governance committee under the co-development and co-promotion agreement for the first optioned product candidate under the license. We recognize arrangement consideration allocated to each unit of accounting when all of the revenue recognition criteria in Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, Accounting Standards Codification, or ASC, Topic 605, Revenue Recognition, or ASC 605, are satisfied for that particular unit of accounting.

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We expect that $17.3 million of revenue from the Celgene arrangement associated with discovery, research and development services, joint steering committee services and patent committee services will be recognized ratably over the associated period of performance, which was estimated to be three years from the date of the agreement in June 2015. Assuming the co-develop and co-promote agreement is executed and other revenue recognition criteria have been met, we expect to recognize approximately $89.5 million, before any offsetting expenses reimbursable to Celgene, associated with the license to bb2121 and the manufacture of vector and associated payload for bb2121 following the initial Phase I study. This will be recognized using the proportional performance method between 2017 and 2021. The period of performance and recognition pattern will be revisited as the development plan changes or if other events impacting the deliverables occur.

License revenue is generated from our out-license agreements with Novartis Pharma AG, or Novartis, and GlaxoSmithKline Intellectual Property Development Limited, or GSK.  Under our out-licensing agreements we may also recognize revenue from potential future milestone payments and royalties. Financial terms of our out-licensing agreement with Novartis include $7.5 million of potential future milestone payments, $1.1 million of payments for each subsequently licensed product, as well as low single digit royalty payments on net sales of covered products. Financial terms of our agreement with GSK include $1.3 million of potential milestone payments for each marketing authorization for each indication in any country as well as low single digit royalties on net sales of covered products.

Research and development expenses

Research and development expenses consist primarily of costs incurred for the development of our product candidates, which include:

 

employee-related expenses, including salaries, benefits, travel and stock-based compensation expense;

 

expenses incurred under agreements with CROs and clinical sites that conduct our clinical studies;

 

costs of acquiring, developing, and manufacturing clinical study materials;

 

facilities, depreciation, and other expenses, which include direct and allocated expenses for rent and maintenance of facilities, insurance, information technology, and other supplies;

 

costs associated with our research platform and preclinical activities;

 

costs associated with our regulatory, quality assurance and quality control operations; and

 

amortization of intangible assets.

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred. Costs for certain development activities are recognized based on an evaluation of the progress to completion of specific tasks using information and data provided to us by our vendors and our clinical sites. We cannot determine with certainty the duration and completion costs of the current or future clinical studies of our product candidates or if, when, or to what extent we will generate revenues from the commercialization and sale of any of our product candidates that obtain regulatory approval. We may never succeed in achieving regulatory approval for any of our product candidates. The duration, costs, and timing of clinical studies and development of our product candidates will depend on a variety of factors, including:

 

the scope, rate of progress, and expense of our ongoing as well as any additional clinical studies and other research and development activities we undertake;

 

future clinical study results;

 

uncertainties in clinical study enrollment rates;

 

changing standards for regulatory approval; and

 

the timing and receipt of any regulatory approvals.

A change in the outcome of any of these variables with respect to the development of a product candidate could mean a significant change in the costs and timing associated with the development of that product candidate. For example, if the FDA, or another regulatory authority were to require us to conduct clinical studies beyond those that we currently anticipate will be required for the completion of clinical development of a product candidate or if we experience significant delays in enrollment in any of our clinical studies, we could be required to expend significant additional financial resources and time on the completion of clinical development for our product candidates.

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We plan to increase our research and development expenses for the foreseeable future as we continue to advance the clinical development of our Lenti-D and LentiGlobin product candidates, conduct research and development activities in the field of oncology and continue the research and development of product candidates using our gene editing technology platform. Our research and development activities include the following:

 

We are conducting the Starbeam Study (ALD-102), a Phase II/III clinical study to examine the safety and efficacy of our Lenti-D product candidate in the treatment of subjects with CALD. In May 2015, we announced that this study has been fully enrolled. In December 2016, we announced that we are amending the protocol for this study to enroll up to an additional eight subjects.

 

We are conducting the Northstar Study (HGB-204), a Phase I/II clinical study in the United States, Australia and Thailand to study the safety and efficacy of our LentiGlobin product candidate in the treatment of subjects with TDT. In March 2014, we announced that the first subject had been treated in this study. In May 2016, we announced that this study has been fully enrolled.

 

We are conducting the HGB-205 study, a Phase I/II clinical study in France to study the safety and efficacy of our LentiGlobin product candidate in the treatment of subjects with TDT and of subjects with severe SCD. In December 2013, we announced that the first subject with TDT had been treated in this study and in October 2014, we announced that the first subject with severe SCD had been treated in this study. In February 2017, we announced that this study has been fully enrolled.

 

We are conducting the HGB-206 study, a Phase I clinical study in the United States to study the safety and efficacy of our LentiGlobin product candidate in the treatment of subjects with severe SCD. In June 2015, we announced that the first subject with severe SCD had been treated in this study. In October 2016, we announced that we have amended the protocol for this study to incorporate several process changes and to expand enrollment.

 

We are conducting the Northstar-2 Study (HGB-207), a Phase III study at multiple sites internationally to examine the safety and efficacy of our LentiGlobin product candidate in the treatment of subjects with TDT and a non-β00 genotype. In December 2016, we announced that the first subject had been treated in this study. In August 2017, we announced that the adult and adolescen